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Ficus pumila MORACEAE Creeping Fig

Creeping Fig is agressive evergreen vine native to parts of East Asia, Japan, China and Vietnam. It is usually seen on built structures where it can climb vertical surface several stories tall with a network of fine stems densely covered with small heart shaped juvenile leaves. Once the vine has reach the top of its support it will begin to form horizontal branches with adult foliage, more leathery than the juveniles, dark green, about 8cm long by 5cm wide. The pale green fruit appears on the horizontal stems, about 8cm by 6cm wide. As a potential weed it could be very threatening if its pollinating fig wasp Blastophaga pumilae is accidentally or intentionally introduced to Australia. In its home territory it is fed upon by larvae of the butterfly Marpesia petreus. It is hardy, drought tolerant and fast growing. Its woody tendrils can damage buildings and presumably, Australian plants. Its fruit is used in Taiwan as aiyu jelly and in Singapore as ice jelly. It is growing in one location on Ithaca Creek beside Bardon State School.

Juvenile foliage


Ficus pumila

Fruit


Ficus pumila

Fruit inside closeup


Ficus pumila

Drawing


Ficus pumila