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COCCINELLIDAE Lady Beetles

Ladybirds or Ladybird Beetles (COCCINELLIDAE) are also known as Ladybugs and Lady Beetles. The adults are domed, most are brightly colored. Many are predators of aphids and other garden pests and are considered by gardeners as beneficial insects.

Apolinus lividigaster Yellow Shouldered Ladybird


A broadly oval, moderately convex, densely hairy ladybird 2-3.5mm body length with black wing covers and yellow shoulders. Eats aphids only.

Apolinus lividigaster
Photo: Robert Whyte

Archegleis edwardsi (side view)


An unusual Ladybird Beetle with red abdomen under the wing cases, quite large (5-7mm long) and extremely active on Cayratia sp. photographed by Derek Boddington at Mt Glorious in November 2005. Thanks to Chris Burwell, Queensland Museum, for help with the identification of this species. It has been collected at several locations in SE Queensland and NSW as far south as the Victorian border.

Archegleis edwardsi
Photo: Derek Boddington

Archegleis edwardsi (from above)


Archegleis edwardsi
Photo: Derek Boddington

Archegleis sp


Adam Slipinski advised us that this is certainly Archegleis but it does not match any species from Australia (unless it is very aberrant A. delta). It therefore is either an undescribed species or one from another country that has turned up here but has not recorded here before. (It does in fact resemble one of the Indian Archegleis species.) Unfortunately we did not collect the specimen.

Ladybird Beetle
Photo: Robert Whyte

Bucolellus sp


Adam Slipinski advised us this is probably a Bucolellus sp.

Bucolellus
Photo: Robert Whyte

Chilocorus circumdatus (Red Chilocorus)


A ladybird beetle also known as Armoured Scale Predator introduced From China and India as a biological control for white louse scale, oleander scale, oriental scale and red scale. Rich orange colour, about 5 mm long and helmet shaped with fine black margin around the base of the wing covers.

Insect > Beetle > Coccinelidae > Chilocorus circumdatus Red Chilocorus Ladybird Beetle
Photo: Robert Whyte

Coccinella transversalis (Transverse Ladybird)


Medium sized lady beetles, bright orange to orange-red with black pattern, common in Brisbane. Active during the day and both adults and larvae are fierce predators of soft-bodied insects such as aphids. Both adults and larvae can often be found living on the same plants and feeding on the same insects.

Coccinella transversalis (Transverse Ladybird)
Photo: Derek Boddington

Coccinella transversalis (Transverse Ladybird)


Transverse ladybird
Photo: Robert Whyte

Coelophora inaequalis  (Variable Ladybird Beetle)


These ladybirds are bright orange-yellow with four variable black dots on each wing-covers. There is a black line at the meeting edges of the wing-covers.

Insect > Beetle > Coccinelidae > Coelophora inaequalis > Variable Ladybird Beetle ?
Photo: Robert Whyte

Coelophora inaequalis (Variable Ladybird Beetle) mating pair


Ladybird Beetle
Photo: Robert Whyte

Coelophora inaequalis (Variable Ladybird Beetle)


Insect > Beetle > Coccinelidae > Coelophora inaequalis > Variable Ladybird Beetle ?
Photo: Robert Whyte

Coelophora inaequalis (Variable Ladybird Beetle)


The variation in this species (see others on this page) can be quite pronounced.

Variable Ladybird Beetle
Photo: Robert Whyte

Cryptolaemus montrouzieri (Adult Mealybug Destroyer)


Small dark brown lady beetle with a tan to orange head and posterior. C. montrouzieri eggs are yellow. This beetle was imported into the United States in 1891 from Australia by one of the early biological control pioneers, Albert Koebele, to control citrus mealybug in California.

Ladybird Beetle
Photo: Robert Whyte

Cryptolaemus montrouzieri (Adult Mealybug Destroyer)


Mealy Bug destroyer
Photo: Robert Whyte

Cryptolaemus montrouzieri (Larval Mealybug Destroyer)


The larvae grow up to 1.3 cm in length and have woolly appendages of wax (their true legs are barely visible underneath) which makes them resemble mealybugs, although they are about twice as large as the adult female citrus mealybug. (Thanks: Peter Chew.)

Mealy Bug larva
Photo: Robert Whyte

Diomus notescens (Minute Two-spotted Ladybird)


Ladybird Beetle
Photo: Robert Whyte

Diomus notescens (Minute Two-spotted Ladybird) From above


Diomus notescens (Minute Two-spotted Ladybird)
Photo: Robert Whyte

Epilachna guttatopustulata (Large Leafeating Ladybird)


Ladybird Beetle
Photo: Robert Whyte

Halmus chalybeus (Steelblue Ladybird)


A small, black-blue ladybird. Feeds on Cowpea Aphids on Hibiscus and scale insects. Often found on citrus plants, hunting scale insects. Ants tending the aphids aren't able to effectively deter these ladybirds when they hide their limbs under their wing covers.

Insect > Beetle > Coccinelidae > Halmus chalybeus  Steelblue Ladybird
Photo: Robert Whyte

Harmonia testudinaria (Tortoise-shelled Ladybird)


This Harmonia testudinaria has grown up with damage to its wing covers, resulting in a distortion of its normal pattern. This species is an average sized yellow ladybird with a net pattern, also known as Netty Ladybird.

Tortoise-shelled Ladybird
Photo: Robert Whyte

Henosepilachna vigintioctopunctata (28 Spotted Potato Ladybird)


These ladybirds are larger than other species, orange, 13 black spots on each wing cover, two spots on thorax, 28-spotted in total. There were the dense short hairs on its body. Both larvae and adults feed on plants. The adults feed on the upper surfaces of leaves, the larvae feeds on the lower surfaces.

Ladybird Beetle
Photo: Robert Whyte

Henosepilachna vigintioctopunctata (28 Spotted Potato Ladybird)


Henosepilachna vigintioctopunctata (28 Spotted Potato Ladybird)
Photo: Robert Whyte

Hippodamia variegata (White Collared Ladybird)


Insect > Beetle > Ladybird Beetle Hippodamia variegata Spotted Amber Ladybird White collared Ladybird
Photo: Robert Whyte

Illeis galbula (Fungus eating Ladybird)


This photo taken early morning, when the Fungus-eating Ladybird was behaving somewhat recalcitrantly, not wanting to wander about or even take flight. This ladybird eats mildew fungus, which is enough to make anyone sleepy. Normally fast moving and active fliers, smooth, shiny, yellow on black pattern.

Ladybird Beetle
Photo: Robert Whyte

Micraspis frenata (Striped Ladybird)


Striped Ladybirds are light brown, with three stripes on their back. Common in late Spring. They are quick to flight, sometimes dropping first. This specimen was on the exotic weed "Mother of Millions". Females are same size or slightly bigger than the males.

Ladybird
Photo: Robert Whyte

Parapriasus australasiae (Orange Spotted Ladybird)


This species seems to feed readily on the soft scale insects such as Black Scale Saissetia oleae and the close relatives.

Ladybird Beetle
Photo: Robert Whyte

References


 
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